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Bullwinkle Moose
[[File:Public Domain robot toy.png|250px| ]]
 
Sidekick
1959—present
Moosylvania
State Governor
1955—present
Personal Details
Residence: Moosylvania
Party: Bull Moose


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Chair

<A href="/Libertarian_National_Committee" title= "Libertarian National Committee">Libertarian National

Committee</A>
1991—1993
Predecessor: <A href="/Dave_Walter" title= "Dave Walter">Dave Walter</A>
Successor: <A href="/Steve_Dasbach" title= "Steve Dasbach">Steve Dasbach</A>
Chair

<A href="/Libertarian_Party_of_California" title= "Libertarian Party of California">Libertarian Party of

California</A>
1981—1983
Predecessor: <A href="/Bill_Evers" title= "Bill Evers">Bill Evers</A>
Successor: <A href=

"/w/index.php?title=Jack_Dean&action=edit&redlink=1" class=

"new" title="Jack Dean (page does not exist)">Jack Dean</A>

Succession Box Testing


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1652
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Bohdan Chmielnicki
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1652
Next:
Bohdan Chmielnicki
Previous:
1651
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1652
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1652
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Next:
Bohdan Chmielnicki
Preceded by:
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1652

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Legacy Gradient Test

All
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CSS1
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Webkit 2
Opera
MSIE 10
CSS3
CSS3 No Templates

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Table in a Table Test

2016 Libertarian Party Convention Presidential Nomination
Gary Johnson Austin Petersen John McAfee
1st Round Upper left Upper middle Right side
2nd Round Lower left Lower middle Lower right
2016LPConPresResultsRound2 Blank.png
2nd Round Delegate Vote Results. Delegate majorities are represented as Green for Gary Johnson, Blue for Austin Petersen, and Orange for John McAfee. Black denotes states where delegate majority was split, and grey indicates states that did not participate.


Table color Test

2016 United States Presidential Election [1]
Party Candidate/Running Mate Electoral Votes Percent Votes
Republican Donald Trump/Mike Pence 304 46.2% 62,979,984
Democratic Hillary Clinton/Tim Kaine 227 48.3% 65,844,969
Libertarian Gary Johnson/Bill Weld 0 3.3% 4,492,919
Green Jill Stein/Ajamu Baraka 0 1.1% 1,449,370
Others (Various) 7 1.2% 1,684,908

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Wiki List Formatting Test

  1. Alfa
  2. Bravo
  3. Charlie
  4. Delta
  5. Echo
  6. Foxtrot
  7. Golf




Henry Stuart Hazlitt
Personal Details
Birth: November 28, 1894
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Death: July 9, 1993(1993-07-09) (aged 98)
Fairfield, Connecticut, USA
Education: City College, New York(No Degree)
Military: Army Air Service (1918)
Occupation: Economist, Author, News Paper Editor

Warning: Default sort key "Hazlitt, Henry" overrides earlier default sort key "Moose, Bullwinkle".

Henry Stuart Hazlitt (November 28, 1894—July 9, 1993) was an American journalist, literary critic, economist, and newspaper editor who wrote and edited business and finance articles for such publications as the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, and The Freeman. Hazlitt belonged to the Austrian School of Economics and is most notable for his 1946 book Economics in One Lesson. Despite never being trained as an economist, Henry Hazlitt's contribution to Libertarian economic thought is highly praised with Ludwig von Mises going as far as to call him “the economic conscience of our country and of our nation.”

Life

Early Life and Education

Henry Stuart Hazlitt was born in Philadelphia, son of Stuart Clark Hazlitt and Bertha Zaunder Hazlitt. Stuart died at the age of 28, when Henry was a baby. This resulted in an early life of relative poverty. After his mother remarried he spent the rest of his childhood in Brooklyn, New York. Hazlitt became interested in philosophy and aspired to pursue a career in psychology and philosophy. He attended New York City College but had to drop out of university without finishing a degree in order to provide for his mother as his stepfather had passed away. Hazlitt proceeded to work odd jobs, never lasting with one employer for long.

Career

At the age of 20, when he finally got a job at the Wall Street Journal as a stenographer, he had already finished his first book, "Thinking as a Science", which was published in 1915. In 1920, Hazlitt became financial editor of The New York Evening Mail. While at the Mail in 1922, his second book appeared, titled "The Way to Will Power". Hazlitt later served as literary editor at The New York Sun from 1925 to 1929 and as literary editor of the left-leaning journal, The Nation starting in 1930. As part of his duties at The Nation, Hazlitt edited a series of essays titled "A Practical Program for America". Hazlitt, as a free-market thinker, often found himself clashing with the rest of the editorial staff at The Nation. As The Nation was advocating for greater government involvement to combat the Great Depression, Hazlitt was advocating for the opposite. This resulted in a series of public debates with socialist Louis Fischer and the parting of ways between Hazlitt and The Nation in 1933. Later, Hazlitt published "The Anatomy of Criticism" and in the same year he shortly served at H.L. Mencken's The American Mercury.

From 1934 to 1946, Hazlitt was the principal editor writer on finance and economics for The New York Times. At the Times he both a weekly collum and numerous unsigned editorials on economics. It was during this time that Hazlitt met economist [Ludwig von Mises], whose work Hazlitt had often read and praised. In 1938, for example, he reviewed von Mises's treatise Socialism for the Times declaring it "a classic" and "the most devastating analysis of socialism yet penned." After Mises was forced to flee Europe in 1940 for fear of persecution by the encroaching Nazi war machine, Hazlitt arranged for Mises to contribute editorials at the "Times" and helped Mises secure a teaching position at New York University. Hazlitt was also instrumental in ensuring F.A. Hayek's The Road to Serfdom reached a large audience in America. His 1944 review of The Road to Serfdom lead to Reader's Digest publishing a consolidation of Hayek's book allowing more people to access the Austrian's writings.

After the Second World War, Hazlitt came into conflict with the publisher of the Times over the subject of the Bretton Woods system which resulted in the creation of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Hazlitt feared and warned of the potential for inflation while the Times was preparing to endorse the new system. This caused Hazlitt to leave the publication and join Newsweek magazine. It was at Newsweek where Hazlitt wrote his most important contribution to the Austrian School of Economics and Libertarian thought, ''Economics in One Lesson''. In 1947, Hazlitt wrote Will Dollars Save the World?, a book that served to dismiss the reasoning behind the Marshall Plan which he believed was nothing more than an international welfare scheme. Around this time, Hazlitt became a founding vice president of the Foundation of Economic Education (FEE) and a founding member of the Mont Pelerin Society. From 1950 to 1953 he served as editor and editor-in-chief of ''The Freeman'', a libertarian magazine published by the FEE. Hazlitt became well known for his articles, books, and radio debates with prominent politicians including Vice President Henry A. Wallace and future VP Hubert H. Humphrey.

Personal Life

Legacy

Publications

  • Thinking as a Science, 1916
  • The Way to Will-Power, 1922
  • A Practical Program for America, 1932
  • The Anatomy of Criticism, 1933
  • Instead of Dictatorship, 1933
  • A New Constitution Now, 1942
  • Freedom in America: The Freeman (with Virgil Jordan), 1945
  • The Full Employment Bill: An Analysis, 1945
  • Economics in One Lesson, 1946
  • Will Dollars Save the World?, 1947
  • Forum: Do Current Events Indicate Greater Government Regulation, Nationalization, or Socialization?, Proceedings from a Conference Sponsored by The Economic and Business Foundation, 1948
  • The Illusions of Point Four, 1950
  • The Great Idea, 1951 (titled Time Will Run Back in Great Britain, revised and rereleased with this title in 1966.)
  • The Free Man's Library, 1956
  • The Failure of the 'New Economics': An Analysis of the Keynesian Fallacies, 1959
  • The Critics of Keynesian Economics (ed.), 1960
  • What You Should Know About Inflation, 1960
  • The Foundations of Morality, 1964
  • Man vs. The Welfare State, 1969
  • The Conquest of Poverty, 1973
  • To Stop Inflation, Return to Gold, 1974
  • The Inflation Crisis, and How To Resolve It, 1978
  • From Bretton Woods to World Inflation, 1984
  • The Wisdom of the Stoics: Selections from Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius, with Frances Hazlitt, 1984
  • The Wisdom of Henry Hazlitt, 1993
  • Rules for Living: The Ethics of Social Cooperation, 1999 (an abridgment by Bettina Bien Greaves of Hazlitt's The Foundations of Morality.)
  • Business Tides: The Newsweek Era of Henry Hazlitt, 2011

External Links

Wikipedia

Ludwig von Mises Institute Profile

Interview in the Austrian Economics Newsletter Spring 1984

A Biography of Henry Hazlitt

Foundation of Economic Education Biography

Economics in One Lesson Profile