National Convention

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The Libertarian National Convention is currently held every two years by the Libertarian Party to elect members of the Libertarian National Committee, to consider amendments to the Platofrm and Bylaws, and to conduct other party business. It usually also includes guest speakers and other educational and social events. In presidential election years, the convention delegates nominate the Libertarian presidential and vice-presidential candidates who then face the nominees of other parties in the November general election. Convention delegates are chosen through processes specific to each state affiliate with delegate allocation determined according to the number of national members they have and the number of votes received for the Libertarian Presidential candidate in that state in the prior presidential election.

The first Libertarian National Convention was held in 1972 in Denver, Colorado. John Hospers and Tonie Nathan were nominated presidential and vice presidential candidates respectively. They received the first electoral vote won by a woman, cast by Roger MacBride.

Until 1980, conventions were held annually, although not all of these included election of officers or other formal business.

From 1981 through 1993, conventions were held in odd-numbered years, with the presidential nomination being made in the year preceding the presidential election; this was considered a practical necessity to allow sufficient time to qualify the national ticket for the ballot.

Starting in 1996, conventions have been held in even-numbered years, with the presidential nomination being made in the presidential election year.

Convention History

Future Conventions